Tour Atlanta's Historic Oakland Cemetery

Visitors from all over the world come to the cemetery for its historic markers, gardens and tours. Locals enjoy the Victorian garden all year long.
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Photo By: Krista Turner Photography

Photo By: Holly Aguirre

Photo By: Holly Aguirre

Photo By: Krista Turner Photography

Photo By: Krista Turner Photography

Photo By: Holly Aguirre

Photo By: Holly Aguirre

Photo By: Holly Aguirre

Photo By: Holly Aguirre

Photo By: Holly Aguirre

Photo By: Holly Aguirre

Photo By: Holly Aguirre

Photo By: Holly Aguirre

Photo By: Holly Aguirre

Photo By: Holly Aguirre

Photo By: Holly Aguirre

Photo By: Holly Aguirre

Photo By: Holly Aguirre

Photo By: Holly Aguirre

Photo By: Holly Aguirre

Photo By: Holly Aguirre

Photo By: Holly Aguirre

Photo By: Holly Aguirre

Entrance

Visitors from all over the world come to Oakland for Sunday in the Park, themed guided tours, the Tunes From the Tombs music festival or just to spot the graves of Margaret Mitchell or legendary golfer Bobby Jones.

Afternoon Strolls

Some may find an afternoon in the cemetery a bit macabre, but Atlantans enjoy it for running, picnics, dog-walking and even weddings, parties and festivals.

Dougherty Monument

Daniel Dougherty reportedly owned Atlanta's first bakery and was stabbed to death on Whitehall Street at the age of 45 in 1855.

Sunday in the Park

In between the live music there is a Victorian costume contest.

Varsity Picnic

This family enjoys a picnic lunch from the Varsity on one of Oakland's many lawns.

Maynard Jackson

Mayor Maynard Jackson, Atlanta's first black mayor, died in 2003. His wife wanted his grave positioned so that if he sat up he'd have a clear view of downtown Atlanta.

Mayor Jackson's View

If one were to sit on the bench to the left of the former mayor's grave, this would be their view.

Marthasville

This is the tombstone of Martha Lumpkin Compton, daughter of Governor Wilson Lumpkin, for whom Atlanta was once named Marthasville.

Downtown View

A portion of the Atlanta skyline is visible from the cemetery, adding to its unique charm.

Jewish Grounds

The historic markers of the Jewish grounds in the cemetery are visible from the porch of Six Feet Under, a restaurant and bar across the street.

Grant Park

Just outside the cemetery are several great restaurants and bars including Ria's Bluebird, Six Feet Under and Octane.

Tattoo Parlor

The Only You Tattoo Parlor is just one of the eclectic businesses just outside the cemetery.

Tombs

Though there are 40,000 markers in Oakland, an estimated 70,000 are buried there including the indigent in Potter's Field and numerous Confederate soldiers.

Pathways

The hallowed grounds were vandalized in the 1970s and much money was needed to repair the damage.

Confederate Soldiers

Of the approximately 70,000 graves, some 6,900 are Confederate soldiers who died in Atlanta hospitals or on nearby battlefields.

Garden Flowers

The Garden Club of Georgia sponsors a free tour that can be accessed via your smartphone.

Evergreens

In 2008 a tornado ripped through Oakland and many trees were uprooted. Volunteers planted new ones in their place.

Unique Headstones

Much of the cemetery's appeal is the myriad unique headstones, like the logs on the tombstone of Edwin Nash Broyles, who was a colonel in the Confederate Army.

Exotic Plants

Tropical plants were typical of Victorian gardens, and Atlanta’s first greenhouse was built to grow flowers for the cemetery.

Roses

Some of the flowers were planted by the deceased's family.

Capitol View

Off to the right, you can see Georgia's historic state capitol in the background.

Flowers

Three part-time workers and countless volunteers help maintain the grounds at the historic cemetery and gardens.

Plant Life

Oakland Cemetery is a classic example of a Victorian Garden and has more than 38 acres of lush plant life.