3 Great Places to See Fall Foliage

From the Adirondacks to the Blue Ridge Mountains, we've rounded up three of our favorite spots to take in the awesome colors of fall.

Photo By: Brasstown Valley Resort & Spa

Photo By: Brasstown Valley Resort & Spa

Photo By: Whiteface Lodge

Photo By: the Biltmore

Photo By: the Biltmore

Brasstown Valley Resort & Spa

Set in the North Georgia mountains about a two-hour drive from Atlanta is the state-owned Brasstown Valley Resort & Spa, a locale that golfers have been trying to keep secret for years. Golf Digest let the gopher out of the bag when they named Brasstown’s 18-hole course one of the top public places to play.

Brasstown Valley Resort & Spa

Brasstown also boasts a world-class spa, stables and horse trails, and a fantastic restaurant. Ask for a room with a view or take cocktails on the lodge’s rocking chair veranda. You’ll swear it's almost heaven. 

Whiteface Lodge

Nestled within the Adirondack Park amongst some of the most vivid colors of fall is the stunning Whiteface Lodge. The Lodge, which sits on serene Lake Placid in New York, was built in 2005 to celebrate the historic 19th-century architecture that defined the region. The wood-beamed exteriors and massive cast iron fireplaces evoke the rustic romanticism of yesteryear, while 21st-century amenities, like a full-service spa, fine dining, a movie theater and a bowling alley, satisfy our need to be pampered. 

Biltmore Estate

Biltmore Estate in Asheville, N.C., is the dream home of tycoon and philanthropist George Vanderbilt, and there's no finer place to take in the splendor of fall below the Mason-Dixon. It was an 1888 visit to Asheville and the Blue Ridge Mountains that ignited Vanderbilt’s passion for the area and gave birth to his plans for a grand summer home. 

Biltmore Estate

The 250-room chateau took six years to complete and employed some of America’s most talented craftsmen and designers. Vanderbilt lived on the estate for many years and in 1930, his daughter Cornelia opened the home to the public hoping to encourage travel to the region during the Great Depression. Today, there is an inn, a village and a winery for visitors to enjoy. The gardens alone are worth a visit.